Something to Read on the Ride: Dan Fiorella

Another great guest today on my blog: multi-talented author Dan Fiorella, who has been published pretty much everywhere, is clearly a fun character, and also a PC game writer. Dan gets two pics because he has the most adorable puppy on display on his Amazon page and that gives him twice the right to be seen.

Let’s meet Dan:

Dan FiorellaDan Fiorella lives in New York City. Downtown New York. Very downtown. Okay, he lives in Staten Island. He has written for stage, screen and radio speaker. From Cracked magazine to Prairie Home Companion, his comedy insights and insults have given belly laughs to the masses.

In addition to Cracked, he’s been published in MAD, Reader’s Digest, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, the Staten Island Advance, Weekly World News and, in France, his Sherlock Holmes parody was included in the anthology “Sherlock Holmes Dans Tous Ses États.”

He’s worked on “The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers” and “The Start of Something Big” for TV and written comedy material for the American Comedy Network and All Star Radio. And was the writer for the PC game “The Lost Cases of Sherlock Homes 2.”

Let’s ask Dan 8 questions:

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

A palaeontologist.  I was in love with dinosaurs and read every book about them.  Then I found out there was an actual name for a “dinosaur guy.”  And an eight-year old who can pronounce “palaeontologist” really impresses adults.

The first book you read was…?

The Dick & Jane series.  Required reading at school.  After that, the Hardy Boys books.

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

I’m not sure I have.  I knew I liked it.  I knew some of it got good reactions.  It probably wasn’t until college when a teacher asked me to write sketches for a weekly lunch program that I started to think of it as a talent I had.

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?Dan Fiorella and puppy

I’m really not sure I have a genre.  I’ve liked different books, but they rarely send me off into other books in a genre.  But I find a lot of books do tend to be in the detective/mystery style format.  But if it’s got a goofy twist on it, I’m in.

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

I keep reading YA books…but luckily things like Harry Potter, Lemony Snicket and Artemis Fowl kind of transcend them.

You write…?

Humor, comedy, funny stuff.  Whether  skits, screenplays or this new fangled book stuff, it’s always about setting up a funny situation and the humor that can build out of it.

The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

That someone laughed out loud while reading my book.  Can you imagine that?  Someone on the subway or bus reads something I wrote and busts out laughing?  And all those people just stare at him like, “What’s his problem?”  I did that!

What’s next…?

I’ve actually fallen in love with one of my characters, Nick Flebber, PI.  I published two novella (Lost Claus & Space Case) and a short story (Cupid is as Cupid Does) featuring him and his off-beat cases, and I’m now laying the ground work for another.  But before that there’s a childhood tale I want to finish about a kid and his adventures leading up to Halloween.

Copertina-Sandro-Beneficenza6To read Dan Fiorella’s short and donate to a great cause, the Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hopital Charity, buy Something to Read on the Ride. It’s only $2.99 and all the proceeds go to the charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: Dan Fiorella

Something to Read on the Ride: Stella Wilkinson

Stella Wilkinson avatarIt’s the middle of the week, and today’s guest in my cozy corner of the web is Something to Read on the Ride’s very own intrepid captain, British author, Stella Wilkinson.

Let’s meet Stella who has the cutest avatar ever (she also gets bonus points for being the one who thought of putting together the collective):

Stella Wilkinson lives in Somerset, England, UK.
Even though Stella is now old and married and really dull, she wishes she could have been forever a Young Adult/New Adult.

She says: In The Flirting Games series my little world revolves around a group of teenagers at Boarding School in England. Mainly their romances, after all what is more fun than that? Book 2, More Flirting Games, and Book 3, Further Flirting Games are also available. There may be more in The Flirting Games series, if you all like them enough; but I’ve got a few others up my sleeve too, some Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romance.

I love feedback and comments! Follow me on Twitter: @fantastyscribble
Also you can follow my blogs at: http://flirtinggames.blogspot.co.uk/

More than anything I love to read, so chuck some recommendations at me too. Books are more precious then diamonds to me. My desk is in a room filled with shelf after shelf of antique books that I’ve never read but I keep collecting because the view of the spines alone is inspirational. To be fair most of the antique books look pretty dull inside, they have titles like ‘Bridleways of Somerset’. These days, when I read, I use my kindle. My kindle is the item I would save from a fire, after family, and photos of course, oh and my laptop, and perhaps just a few of my first editions, and the chocolate hobnobs…

Now, let’s ask her a few questions… 8 to be precise.

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

Lois Lane. I carried around a notebook looking for good stories to write, and started our school newspaper just so I could print them. I never did get to date Superman though…

The first book you read was…?

Uh, The Bad Tempered Ladybird, I think. If you mean grown up book then I spent my teens devouring Mills and Boon romance novels.

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

I wrote some stories for Harry Potter Fan Fic (HPFF) and got a huge response of positive reviews, that’s when I started on The Flirting Games Series.

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?

Paranormal Romance and Urban Fantasy

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

Riders, by Jilly Cooper. I’ve read it at least ten times. I love all her anti-heros. Bad boys that come good, or sometimes get their comeuppance.

You write…?

Mainly stories for teenage girls. The Flirting Games has three books in the series so far and more to come.

The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

Emails direct from fans. That someone took the time to personally mail me to say how much they liked the books is a massive incentive. I’m always stunned that with modern technology people are picking up my books from all over the world, it’s so flattering.

What’s next…?

I did a short story on Amazon for Halloween, called Halloween Magic & Mayhem. I got such good feedback from it that I’m writing a sequel, Werewolf Magic & Mayhem, which should be out just before Christmas.

Stella’s Very Important Public Announcement:

We’re also putting together another charity anthology of short stories based on the success of Something to Read on the Ride. It will be called Something for the Journey. People are welcome to email me direct swilkinsonauthor@gmail.com if they are interested in submitting a story.

And finally, don’t’ forget:

To read Stella Wilkinson’s short and donate to a great cause, the Wallace and Gromit’s Copertina-Sandro-Beneficenza6Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hopital Charity, buy Something to Read on the Ride. It’s only $2.99 and all the proceeds go to the charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: Stella Wilkinson

Something to Read on the Ride: J David Core

The Writer’s Café’ is a fantastic cyber-space to frequent if you are a writer. Thanks to my daily lurking there, I came to know about Stella Wilkinson’s charity project, Something to Read on the Ride. Thanks to participating to the collective, I am getting to know awesome people.  I am also reading the anthology and the shorts are great reading material. Today, to start the week in style, author J David Core is visiting my blog.

Let’s meet David:

J David CoreWith a profound interest in religion, liberal politics and humor, Dave began writing in High School and has not given up on it since. His first professional writing jobs came while attending the Art Institute of Pittsburgh when he was hired to create political cartoons for the Pitt News & to write humor pieces for Smile Magazine. Dave has worked in the newspaper industry as a photographer, in the online publishing industry as a weekly contributor to Streetmail.com, and was a contributing writer to the Buzz On series of informational books and to the Western online anthology, Elbow Creek. Dave’s science fiction novel, Synthetic Blood and Mixed Emotions, is available from writewordsinc.com.

Dave currently resides in his childhood home in Toronto, OH with his beautiful girlfriend and his teenage daughter. He enjoys participating in local community events & visiting with his two adult children and his grandson. His writing blog is available at http://tinyurl.com/lupalanding/

Let’s interrogate David:

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

I wanted to be a scientist, but I had no idea what that really meant. I wanted to understand the origins of life and the mechanics of the universe. I did not want to do math or spend days developing and repeating mundane experiments. Fiction only ever shows us the result of the work, not the drudgery. So I decided to become a guy who “invents” the end result.

The first book you read was…?

I think it was Alice in Wonderland. The story has a unique voice and is incredibly imaginative and – yes – inventive. It still ranks as one of my all-time favorites. Plus the illustrations by Tenniel were incredible.

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

I was always a loner as a kid. I spent most of my youth inside my own head creating fanciful experiences for myself. Then when I entered high school I suddenly found a group of creative people to hang out with. They were all musicians and I can’t carry a tune, so I tried my hand at writing lyrics. Turns out that time I spent conditioning my brain to invent entertainment for myself had set the groundwork for a creative platform.

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?

I love mysteries, thrillers and sci-fi. I don’t think I have a favorite though. I have some least favorites though. I don’t care for chick lit (Nickolas Sparks, RJ Waller) nor am I a fan of introspective fiction (Eat, Pray, Love or The Life of Pi.) I appreciate them, but I’m just not a fan.

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

I don’t even have a Kindle. I read eBooks on my phone or PC, and I also blog and do reviews so all of the titles in my “to read” list are books I intend to review. However, if you’re asking what my secret vice reading material is, I already told you I love Alice in Wonderland.

You write…?

I write in several genres, but all of my writing has a noir feel to it. My published novellas include humor, sci-fi, mysteries and straight-up noir all with a crime element and a hard-boiled undertone to the writing.

The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

People say my stories are readable. In fact, the main criticism I get is that my stories are not descriptive and flowery enough for some readers’ tastes. To me, that criticism is high praise. One critic complained that my first novel begins with a descriptive and elaborate description of coming into Pittsburgh at night through the Ft. Pitt tunnel. The reviewer loved that paragraph – which I had included as a gimmick – and felt cheated when the rest of the book told a good story but never lived up to the haute fiction promise of that opening paragraph. To me – the reviewer may as well have said, “Core can write like James Joyce when he wants, but he prefers to channel Hemingway.”

What’s next…?

I’m currently re-writing the second novel in my mystery novel series for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month.) When I finish that, I have an idea for a novelette about Copertina Sandro Beneficenzatwo boys who put an unconscious friend on a bouncing Betty landmine one of their parents owns in an illegal collection of live munitions. They want to see if the three of them can figure out a way to diffuse the mine under those circumstances. After that, I may try my hand at a non-fiction series of essays about religious belief. We shall see.

To read J David Core’s short and donate to a great cause, the Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hopital Charity, buy Something to Read on the Ride. It’s only $2.99 and all the proceeds go to the charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: J David Core