Something to Read on the Ride: James Griffiths

Today, I am pleased to host a debuting author, James Griffiths. Let’s welcome James into the publishing arena by buying Something to Read on the Ride, and don’t forget to let him know how much you liked his short, Through Glass.

James Griffiths author picIn his own words:

I’m 18 studying journalism at Cardiff University. My “Something to Read on the Ride” contribution was my first properly published piece of fiction, however I am a contributor to the student newspaper too.

Currently juggling the prospect of being a journalist or an author or both! I also dabble in theatre from time to time and constantly seem to find myself with a guitar in my hands. You can follow me on Twitter @JGriff95, if you’re into that sort of thing. I’m sure you won’t regret the decision!

Now, let’s hear his answers to my 8 questions: 

1. When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

It’s something that has changed a few times but I’ve always wanted to simply be creative. During my childhood I wanted to be an author and still do, but I’ve also felt inspired to become an actor or a journalist more recently. I tend to stick with “writer” to answer that question these days!

2. The first book you read was…?

I can’t remember the exact first book I read but I remember as a child absolutely loving “The Edge Chronicles” by Paul Stewart and Chris Riddell. My friend gave me a copy of “Beyond the Deepwoods” and I never looked back, Riddell’s illustrations are so rich and brilliantly complemented the imaginative world that I read about.

3. You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

Realizing in primary school that English was by far my best subject, and constantly looking forward to the creative writing tasks. I’m not sure I thought then that I was “good” and I still don’t, but I know writing is one of my favourite things.

4. As a reader, your favorite genre is…?

Either fantasy, sci-fi or thriller. Something with a good adventure, memorable characters and has an edge to it.

5. No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

A Clash of Kings by big George, the second one of the Game of Thrones books.

6. You write…?

A sort of mish-mash of fantasy and sci-fi, I like to go in for good realism and dark undertones.

7. The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

I haven’t really written enough to gather much praise but a couple of people have praised the creative imagination in my writing.

8. What’s next…?

Working on some sci-fi about gangs, sewers and a metropolis. It’s sort of inspired by the Copertina Sandro Beneficenzavideo game Fallout 3 among other things!

 

And once again, don’t forget to buy Something to Read on the Ride to read James’s short. You will also support a great cause, the Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hospital Charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: James Griffiths

Something to Read on the Ride: Paul B. Kohler

Wednesday on this side of the hemisphere, frigid cold but sunny outside, warm and cozy inside. Today, our guest is author Paul B. Kohler, who, in his own words, when not practicing architecture, works on his writing. He lives in Littleton, Colorado, with his wife and daughter. Linear Shift, Part One, his serialized novel, sounds rather intriguing.

Linear Shift, Part One

No one said time travel would be easy.
Peter Cooper, a widowed father of two whose life is crumbling around him—until a bizarre encounter with a desperate Army general launches him on a risky mission: to go back to 1942 and change a moment in time. The repercussions will almost certainly alter the conclusion of World War II. But will the ripple effects stop there? And what kind of life will Peter return to?
Unknown Consequences:
A successful mission may not have the success he had intended.
Linear Shift is a serialized novel, with four total parts planned. This is part one.

NB: Part Two is coming soon!

Paul B KohlerPaul has gracefully agreed to answer my 8 questions:

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

Growing up, I wanted to be everything.  My earliest memory was to be a fighter pilot. I loved the Blue Angels and knew that would be me up here one day. The next week, I am certain it was something else.  From the time I was 10 or so, I wanted to be an architect.  That one stuck all through high school, and that is my day job today.

The first book you read was…?

I cannot remember the name of the first book I read.  I know the main character was a bi-plane pilot, and I think his last name was Buchanan.  It was an old book when I read it, and I LOVED that book.  Somewhere along the way, I lost it, as well as the name.  I have occasionally tried to google search on something new I will occasionally remember from it.  It’s hard trying to remember something that happened 30+ years ago.

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

Actually, my first story I ever wrote was Amy.  I wrote it about a year and a half after my daughter was born.  I occasionally, I would write about my day or other lame stuff when I was 29, but after writing that first story and having my wife cry when she read it, told me I was on to something.  Not for making my wife cry, but by being able to dray out emotions with the written word.

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?

I LOVE Sci-Fi.  I cannot get enough of it.  Space flight = good. Aliens = good. Time Travel = good.  You get the point.  My love for Sci-Fi has been very intimidating though, as that is the genre I most want to write in, but I feel so inferior after reading so many good stories from so many great authors.

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

Hmm.  I think there might be a story or two on there that is in the erotic fiction category.  I got them free a few months back, and wanted to see what all the fuss was about.  I figured why not try and bang out a story in that genre. You’re all safe though, as I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

You write…?

Linear Shift coverI write what moves me.  Right now, I am in starting the 3rd part to a Time Travel serial.  Part 1 is published, and part 2 will be in early December. I have a huge imagination, and I have a ton of story ideas to get to.  From adult-contemporary to horror, and even romance.  My mind is all over the place sometimes.

The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

I like the surprise aspect. Take my short story Amy for instance: I don’t particularly like to make people tear up from reading my stories, but I’ve gotten so many to get emotional after reading it, I feel like I can actually move people.  I win, and here’s some tissue. The praise doesn’t necessarily mean words.

What’s next…?

After my Linear Shift project, which I am hoping to wrap up in April (if not sooner) I have a few things I’ve been thinking about.  One in particular would be a stand alone literary story, about a father and son finding a common bond after half of their family is killed in a house fire.  I’ve been thinking a lot about it, and I feel it’s about time to make more people cry.

Don’t forget to buy Something to Read on the Ride to read Paul’s short andCopertina Sandro Beneficenza support a great cause: The Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hospital Charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: Paul B. Kohler

Something to Read on the Ride: Louis Hessey-Antell

Louis Hessey AntellAnother week, another author who donated a short to Something to Read on the Ride. Today, gracing my cyber corner is British author, Louis Hessey-Antell. As often happens with creative people, Louis has much to share with the ever-growing, worldwide artistic community. Stay tuned for the imminent release of two of his works. Meanwhile, enjoy his interview.

Let’s meet Louis:

I’m 25 and currently working in ‘The Office’ come to life. On the side, I’m writing novels, making films, composing songs and creating a comic book. It sounds more impressive than it is, believe me!

While I will always be trying to contribute to the cultural conversation, it would be a pleasant turn of events to be able to financially rest on my creative wits. 

I also have a blog, The Rational Rock ‘n’ Roll, which hasn’t seen much action recently, but I stand by every word!

My first novel (working title: News, Booze and Heat-Death) is being dragged through its final draft, and my comic book, Numachi, is moving along nicely. I look forward to sharing them. 

Now, let’s ask Louis a few questions:

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

John Entwistle’s replacement in The Who. 

The first book you read was…?

I believe it was the old Catcher in the Rye. I can’t remember earlier than that to be honest! 

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

I wouldn’t dream of calling myself good. However, once a friend paid me a tenner to do his English coursework for him. The teacher marked it and told him he should be a writer. I never received such praise. 

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?

Amis style comedy. Dark and funny. 

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

A lot of Batman comics! I’m fairly open about that though. 

You write…?

Real life after a couple of beers. 

The praise about your writing you like the most is… ?

I enjoy praise in regard to my style. My favourite author is Wodehouse, so  I yearn for compliments on my style. 

What’s next…?

A novel about a stand up comedian, and a graphic novel about WWII.

Copertina Sandro BeneficenzaTo read Louis’s short and contribute to a great cause, The Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, a Children’s Charity Hospital, buy Something to Read on the Ride!

Something to Read on the Ride: Louis Hessey-Antell

Something to Read on the Ride: Dan Fiorella

Another great guest today on my blog: multi-talented author Dan Fiorella, who has been published pretty much everywhere, is clearly a fun character, and also a PC game writer. Dan gets two pics because he has the most adorable puppy on display on his Amazon page and that gives him twice the right to be seen.

Let’s meet Dan:

Dan FiorellaDan Fiorella lives in New York City. Downtown New York. Very downtown. Okay, he lives in Staten Island. He has written for stage, screen and radio speaker. From Cracked magazine to Prairie Home Companion, his comedy insights and insults have given belly laughs to the masses.

In addition to Cracked, he’s been published in MAD, Reader’s Digest, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, the Staten Island Advance, Weekly World News and, in France, his Sherlock Holmes parody was included in the anthology “Sherlock Holmes Dans Tous Ses États.”

He’s worked on “The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers” and “The Start of Something Big” for TV and written comedy material for the American Comedy Network and All Star Radio. And was the writer for the PC game “The Lost Cases of Sherlock Homes 2.”

Let’s ask Dan 8 questions:

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

A palaeontologist.  I was in love with dinosaurs and read every book about them.  Then I found out there was an actual name for a “dinosaur guy.”  And an eight-year old who can pronounce “palaeontologist” really impresses adults.

The first book you read was…?

The Dick & Jane series.  Required reading at school.  After that, the Hardy Boys books.

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

I’m not sure I have.  I knew I liked it.  I knew some of it got good reactions.  It probably wasn’t until college when a teacher asked me to write sketches for a weekly lunch program that I started to think of it as a talent I had.

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?Dan Fiorella and puppy

I’m really not sure I have a genre.  I’ve liked different books, but they rarely send me off into other books in a genre.  But I find a lot of books do tend to be in the detective/mystery style format.  But if it’s got a goofy twist on it, I’m in.

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

I keep reading YA books…but luckily things like Harry Potter, Lemony Snicket and Artemis Fowl kind of transcend them.

You write…?

Humor, comedy, funny stuff.  Whether  skits, screenplays or this new fangled book stuff, it’s always about setting up a funny situation and the humor that can build out of it.

The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

That someone laughed out loud while reading my book.  Can you imagine that?  Someone on the subway or bus reads something I wrote and busts out laughing?  And all those people just stare at him like, “What’s his problem?”  I did that!

What’s next…?

I’ve actually fallen in love with one of my characters, Nick Flebber, PI.  I published two novella (Lost Claus & Space Case) and a short story (Cupid is as Cupid Does) featuring him and his off-beat cases, and I’m now laying the ground work for another.  But before that there’s a childhood tale I want to finish about a kid and his adventures leading up to Halloween.

Copertina-Sandro-Beneficenza6To read Dan Fiorella’s short and donate to a great cause, the Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hopital Charity, buy Something to Read on the Ride. It’s only $2.99 and all the proceeds go to the charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: Dan Fiorella

Something to Read on the Ride: J David Core

The Writer’s Café’ is a fantastic cyber-space to frequent if you are a writer. Thanks to my daily lurking there, I came to know about Stella Wilkinson’s charity project, Something to Read on the Ride. Thanks to participating to the collective, I am getting to know awesome people.  I am also reading the anthology and the shorts are great reading material. Today, to start the week in style, author J David Core is visiting my blog.

Let’s meet David:

J David CoreWith a profound interest in religion, liberal politics and humor, Dave began writing in High School and has not given up on it since. His first professional writing jobs came while attending the Art Institute of Pittsburgh when he was hired to create political cartoons for the Pitt News & to write humor pieces for Smile Magazine. Dave has worked in the newspaper industry as a photographer, in the online publishing industry as a weekly contributor to Streetmail.com, and was a contributing writer to the Buzz On series of informational books and to the Western online anthology, Elbow Creek. Dave’s science fiction novel, Synthetic Blood and Mixed Emotions, is available from writewordsinc.com.

Dave currently resides in his childhood home in Toronto, OH with his beautiful girlfriend and his teenage daughter. He enjoys participating in local community events & visiting with his two adult children and his grandson. His writing blog is available at http://tinyurl.com/lupalanding/

Let’s interrogate David:

When you were a kid you wanted to be…?

I wanted to be a scientist, but I had no idea what that really meant. I wanted to understand the origins of life and the mechanics of the universe. I did not want to do math or spend days developing and repeating mundane experiments. Fiction only ever shows us the result of the work, not the drudgery. So I decided to become a guy who “invents” the end result.

The first book you read was…?

I think it was Alice in Wonderland. The story has a unique voice and is incredibly imaginative and – yes – inventive. It still ranks as one of my all-time favorites. Plus the illustrations by Tenniel were incredible.

You discovered you were quite good at writing when…?

I was always a loner as a kid. I spent most of my youth inside my own head creating fanciful experiences for myself. Then when I entered high school I suddenly found a group of creative people to hang out with. They were all musicians and I can’t carry a tune, so I tried my hand at writing lyrics. Turns out that time I spent conditioning my brain to invent entertainment for myself had set the groundwork for a creative platform.

As a reader, your favorite genre is…?

I love mysteries, thrillers and sci-fi. I don’t think I have a favorite though. I have some least favorites though. I don’t care for chick lit (Nickolas Sparks, RJ Waller) nor am I a fan of introspective fiction (Eat, Pray, Love or The Life of Pi.) I appreciate them, but I’m just not a fan.

No, really, what’s that title you’re hiding in your kindle…?

I don’t even have a Kindle. I read eBooks on my phone or PC, and I also blog and do reviews so all of the titles in my “to read” list are books I intend to review. However, if you’re asking what my secret vice reading material is, I already told you I love Alice in Wonderland.

You write…?

I write in several genres, but all of my writing has a noir feel to it. My published novellas include humor, sci-fi, mysteries and straight-up noir all with a crime element and a hard-boiled undertone to the writing.

The praise about your writing you like the most is…?

People say my stories are readable. In fact, the main criticism I get is that my stories are not descriptive and flowery enough for some readers’ tastes. To me, that criticism is high praise. One critic complained that my first novel begins with a descriptive and elaborate description of coming into Pittsburgh at night through the Ft. Pitt tunnel. The reviewer loved that paragraph – which I had included as a gimmick – and felt cheated when the rest of the book told a good story but never lived up to the haute fiction promise of that opening paragraph. To me – the reviewer may as well have said, “Core can write like James Joyce when he wants, but he prefers to channel Hemingway.”

What’s next…?

I’m currently re-writing the second novel in my mystery novel series for NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month.) When I finish that, I have an idea for a novelette about Copertina Sandro Beneficenzatwo boys who put an unconscious friend on a bouncing Betty landmine one of their parents owns in an illegal collection of live munitions. They want to see if the three of them can figure out a way to diffuse the mine under those circumstances. After that, I may try my hand at a non-fiction series of essays about religious belief. We shall see.

To read J David Core’s short and donate to a great cause, the Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hopital Charity, buy Something to Read on the Ride. It’s only $2.99 and all the proceeds go to the charity.

Something to Read on the Ride: J David Core

Something to Read on the Ride: Frank Zubek

Frank Zubek portraitI am pleased to start the weekend by having a most gracious guest, author Frank Zubek, on my blog. Frank is one of the authors who collaborated to the anthology Something to Read on the Ride. Frank, who has been a great supporter of the collective since its inception, has donated not one, but two shorts.

In his own words:

Where do you live and what’s the day job?

Greater Cleveland and I work in retail. The rest of my time is taken up writing and a few hours of sleep.

What inspired this story?

Stella suggested for people to submit a story they had hanging around on their hard drive. I didn’t have any so I decided to think up a new story exclusive for the anthology, which is geared toward people who travel to and from work on buses or subways. I was also a bit worried that we wouldn’t have enough submissions to fill a book so I offered to think up two and she said okay. So my two stories take place on a bus.

How long have you been writing?

1999. I currently have several short stories and a few novellas for sale on amazon.

What are you working on next?

I seem to have run out of ideas for contemporary fiction so I’m switching to fantasy. I have a few adventures that are perfect for a novel.

Can people visit your web-page or blog?

Of course! www.frankzubek.net  is the web page and the blog is www.whatbrickwall.blogspot.com  

Can people contact you?

frank.zubek@yahoo.com  

Copertina Sandro BeneficenzaIf you want to donate to a great cause, Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, A Children’s Hospital Charity, and read Frank’s two shorts, buy the anthology. It’s only $2.99!

Something to Read on the Ride: Frank Zubek

Something to Read on the Ride

Copertina Sandro BeneficenzaI am quite proud to be part of two great charity projects this year. Something to Read on the Ride, edited by author Stella Wilkinson, is the first of the two anthologies for which I donated a short, while Alessandro Fiorini donated the cover.  The book, suitable for all adult readers from 18 – 80,  covers a large range of subjects, from space travel to zombies, romance, humor and tragedy, and from unusual occurrences to every day situations. Stories were donated by authors who hang out at the Writers’ CaféSomething to Read on the Ride is only $2.99, and all the proceeds from the sales will go to Wallace and Gromit’s Grand Appeal, a Children’s Hospital Charity.

My contribute to the anthology, The Centennial Grape, is a science fiction short with a moody atmosphere, homage to the science fiction I grew up with and loved.

Have a great time commuting.

Something to Read on the Ride